Translation Software In Translation Service Industry

It is easy to start a global business, but it is not simple to reach your potential customers. One of the best ways of reaching your target customers is through their own (mother) language. It is because of this reason that these days business of all sizes, operating in international markets are providing translation services as part of their key communicative decisions.

On the face of it, today the complexity of providing translations service has increased and the demand of modern translation tools and software has risen dramatically in the past few years.

Looking at the present picture of global communication; Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) with tools such as Trados, Wordfast, Transit, Translation Manager, etc. has become key technology in the translation service industry. It is expected that with the increased number of official languages in Asia and Europe, and ongoing growth of non-English Internet resources, software translation and computer-aided translation systems will become vital tools in everyday work.

The growing significance of communication cannot be addressed by human translators alone and this has further resulted in the demand for modern tools that save time and increase quality, accurateness and efficiency. The different CAT tools are fast becoming a cornerstone of translations projects around the world. At present doing translation without CAT tools is suicidal, is like going into the wild with bows and arrows. Computer-Assisted Translation programs are needed to help translators in their every day chores and take away the burden of repetitive translations. Human translation will be always needed, where the translator is the pilot that needs to take the key decisions in the translations process and take curves smoothly towards the target language and the CAT is like the racing car, essential to move fast and be competitive.

The present CAT tools are still lacking features that would bring much benefit to the international language translation community, such as:

– Competitive prices!!!! The prices for the most popular CAT tools are still too high for the average translator that needs to dig deep into his pocket to come up with the hard earned money.

– Lack of flexibility when used in conjunction with some DTP programs such as QuarkXpress, Indesign, PageMaker, etc. where text export-import operations are needed together with the introduction of TAGS to preserve the text format.

– Exclusive programs not able to work outside of the Windows environment such as the Macintosh or Linux platforms.

– Problems when working with Far East languages such as Chinese and Japanese and European Operating Systems.

– Large consumption of computer resources.

No doubt there is a lot of room for improvement!

Communication Skills in Any Service Industry Are Still Necessary for Success

Communicating well with the public is important for any business, but it is especially significant for service businesses. Instant text, voice and image communication technologies make it faster and easier to communicate with our customers than ever before. But the content and quality of communication still rely on good verbal and written communication skills. We can use the method of communication our customer prefers, but what we communicate to them remains much more important than how it was sent. It continues to be important for us to hone our verbal and written communication skills and make sure new hires also possess those skills. There are three general types of information that service industry professionals need to communicate to their customers.

Documentation:

Most documentation is required by law, industry standards or company policy and must be communicated to each customer. It usually describes the service performed and the limits of any guarantee or warranty. In addition there is usually some information the service company requires for the customer’s service record or file. Service reports are normally designed so the technician can communicate most of the required information by simply checking off appropriate boxes, but there must be space for the technician to relate specific information about his/her actions. Those comment sections require good written communication skills. As a trainer of new technicians I always warned them of the importance of what they write on those legal documents. They are not only communicating with the customer but also with their supervisor, a regulatory agency, or even a lawyer, judge or jury if there is ever litigation involving the service. Because customers seldom read the service report completely before signing it, it is important for technicians to verbally communicate the information to them to make sure they understand it. This adds value to the service and requires good verbal communication skills. Although documentation is necessary it has the drawback of being primarily one-way communication with little participation from the customer.

Education:

Communicating this type of information involves some customer participation because it is normally provided in response to a question from them. Educational communication should be professional and clearly understood. It requires that the technician have a thorough knowledge of service performance and techniques. Experience, training and third party reference materials help make this type of communication possible but it still requires good verbal communication skills. Educating customers about their particular problem and the solution provided for them will add much value and credibility to each service.

Expression:

This type of communication is often underused or completely overlooked because it is not required by law and is not technical or educational in nature. However, it just may be the most important and fruitful line of communication we can establish with our customers. It expresses our concern, empathy, appreciation and attentiveness. It adds a personal touch to the relationship with our customer. An attentive technician listening and responding to customer concerns; an administrative assistant dealing with customers in a pleasant, efficient and caring manner; a salesperson following up with each new customer after the sale to make sure the problem is being addressed to their satisfaction; or the owner or supervisor sending customers a thank you or holiday card with a brief personal message. These are all examples of expressive communication. We can express ourselves verbally, in writing or even implied by our body language or tone of voice, but we must be sincere. It is this type of communication that turns a customer into a friend and we all know how much harder it is to fire a friend than it is to fire a contractor.

Video Production FAQS For Business and Industry and the Internet

Video production is an effective tool for producing more sales, training employees, and telling the world about products and services. Video presentations can be shown to large groups and be viewed privately by one person. Television is the number one source of information for most people in North American and Europe. Business and Industry has been using industrial films and videos for years. As production costs have dropped, video production has become even more widely used for small businesses. Small businesses can use video to improve their bottom line, but before launching a video production, a little knowledge will help in the overall process and help achieve an effective and useful video presentation.

Here are some frequently asked questions concerning business/industrial video production. Good luck on your video project.

Q. Can we use people from our own company in the video to save talent fees?

A. Talent fees are the key words, here. Generally professional actors are used for voice over and on-screen word. They do a great job. They learn their parts. They can cope with script changes and the many re-takes of scenes. Best of all, however, is that they come across well on the TV screen. In short they have talent. If you need to trim your budget, there are better ways. A good production company can work within most budgets without sacrificing the effectiveness of a production. Using non-professional talent is a risk.

Q. Can’t we have our people in the video at all?

A. Sure. Company people are excellent in video presentations. They are great to have interacting with each other and with clients. Company people can be videotaped for voice over commentary and short sound bites.

Q. Our head salesperson is used to giving presentations on our product all the time. He’s a natural. He’s friendly and people really like him and identify with him. Plus, he knows the product backwards and forwards. Shouldn’t he be the one talking about our product on our video?

A. Sometimes company people can do a good job, especially experts like yours, and we’ve used them in our video productions. One word of caution, however. We’ve seen video productions get shelved soon after they were produced because the spokesperson on the video decided to quit and go to work for the competition. You can’t have your spokesperson (especially, if they’re well-known) saying good things about your product if they are no longer part of your organization. The appearance is that they found a better product or a better company to work for. If companies continue using a video tape with a turn-coat expert, it appears that the video tape is marketing the competition’s product. That’s not good.

Q. How about having our CEO or one of our top managers appear on-camera? Is there anything they can do to come across as professional as possible?

A. Yes, CEOs and top managers are excellent choices for corporate videos. They should be prepared for the shoot with several choices of wardrobe. They should also have their lines memorized. They should review a list of tips and suggestions for looking good on-camera.

Q. Can we shoot our own footage and then have a professional video production company edit the footage?

A. Yes, especially if you have competent people in your organization. We recommend that you read the book, Producing a First-Class Video For Your Business – Work With Professionals or Do It Yourself before you attempt this, however. We’d be happy to consult with you and assist in your production in, anyway. Our book is available at many fine book stores across Canada and the United States. Especially if the book store has a Self-Counsel Press display. Check with your favorite library, as well.

Q. We have some existing footage of our product in the field. It looks really good. It’s on VHS format video tape. Can we use that in the production.

A. We pride ourselves on our ability to incorporate many different types of media into our production. VHS video footage, while it is the lowest resolution format, could be digitized and edited. Results vary. Production companies using digital non-linear formats, could probably handle your request very well, also.

Q. How disruptive is a video production?

A. Full-production, Hollywood-style crews can be disruptive, it’s true. We like to keep crews to a minimum. Sometimes we only use a one-person or two-person crew. This is not only less disruptive, but it also saves money. With new lower-light cameras, the need for the bright lights of Hollywood have gone a little by the wayside.

Q. How long does it take to produce a video?

A. In depends on the complexity, but generally about a month. Video production companies are used to working with deadlines. We’ve done many quick turn-around presentations. We burn the midnight oil for our clients. Visit the PNW Video Production site for a more detailed break down (week by week) of pre-production, production and post-production needs.

Q. What’s the most economical video to produce?

A. A voice/over type is the least expensive. A good, professional voice is essential for the voice over. The more expensive video type is interactive/acting on-camera. This type of production can sometimes double a budget, but produces very effective presentations.

Q. How do we find actors?

A. Most production companies know actors. We have a selection of professional and semi-professional actors to work with. Video tapes and audio tapes (or Reels) are commonly available for review.

Q. Should we ask for a sample tape to look at?

A. Sure. Professional video production companies should either have their own sales & marketing tape (they’re in the business!) or copies of productions that are similar to your project.

What we like to do is talk about the production and budget first. Then we show samples of productions within a selected budget. It doesn’t do our clients any good to show them a champagne budget video, if they’ll be working on a beer budget. The reverse is true, also.

Q. Professional video production companies would have to fly into our location. Wouldn’t it be cheaper for us to hire a local production company?

A. Sometimes. There are many good production companies throughout the world. Even in small communities. There’s a difference, however, in video production and business/industrial video production. There’s no magic in producing a good looking video. What’s more difficult is producing a video that sells a product, service, or viewpoint.

Q. What does a video cost?

A. There are many factors. The usual figure given in the industry is $1,000 to $1,500 hundred per finished minute for quality productions. Many Betacam-SP productions run about $3,000 per finished minute.

Q. We only have a small budget. Is there anything we can do to help cut costs?

A. Certainly. Please, tell the video production company up-front what kind of budget you have in mind. The production can be tailored for your needs and requirements. There are many ways to make video productions more economical. We’re experts in trimming costs.

Q. What video format are used in industrial/business video production?

A. It depends on the budget. There are a wide variety of video formats used by industrial video production companies. VHS is the lowest resolution. Betacam-SP is one of the highest. There are many formats in-between.

Sometimes we shoot on Betacam-SP, a high-resolution broadcast standard. Most often these days, however, video camcorders are recorded in digital format, so the information can be easily transferred to editing computers.

Q. Can you put our completed production on DVD, or CD-ROM for distribution and the internet?

A. We like to know exactly how you intend to use your production. But, no matter how you are distributing, we will use the best format for your video.

Q. What’s the first step? What do we do?

A. Take a few minutes to think about your project and your needs. To produce a video a good industrial video production company will need to know a few things about your company and the presentation.

Here are a few questions to ask yourself:

1. In what setting will the video be shown?

2. Who will be watching the video?

3. What is the purpose of the video?

4. What do you want people to do when they’re through viewing the video?

5. What do you want people to remember about the video?

6. How many poeple are going to view your video?

7. How are you going to distribute the video?

Write your information down and share it with other people in your company to get their responses.

An Overview of the Daycare Service Industry

The daycare or ‘child care’ industry generally refers to the care of children by non-family members outside of the home. The industry is quite broad and includes small home-operated daycare centers right through to large pre-school centers that take on an educational role as well as caring for the physical needs of children.

Some daycare businesses focus on children of a certain age. Infant care centers look after babies and children younger than two and ‘before’ and ‘after’ school care centers cater mainly to older children up until their teenage years. The main sector of the market is children under six who have not started school yet.

Daycare is a multi-billion dollar industry in the US and it has shown phenomenal growth over the past three decades, spurred on by the fact that more women are choosing to work instead of remaining at home with their children. Higher divorce rates have also meant that women are sometimes unable to take care of their children at home and have no choice but to work to support themselves financially.

The industry shows no signs of slowing down and is set to continue to grow over the next decade. Daycare has proven itself to be surprisingly resilient to recessions in the past.

Many people are drawn into the industry as it offers good opportunities for smaller sized businesses and it generally has low barriers to entry in terms of costs as well as red tape. The top reason that attracts people into daycare though would be a love of children. Daycare professionals work with children for most of the day and have a great chance to contribute to their growth and development.

Training requirements are still quite minimal for daycare workers with most states only requiring a child care certificate that can be achieved with less than 100 hours of study. While many people think that working with children is a dream come true they often discover that it can be more stressful than they originally thought so staff turnover rates are generally higher than other industries.

Parents are becoming more selective about the kind of environment that they want to leave their children in. Most parents now understand that the first four or five years of a child’s life are so important in that they highly influence the way that a child will learn and interact with others and their environment as they get older. Daycare has become much more than babysitting as parents have realized that it is important that their children are in an environment that stimulates learning and mental and physical development. There is definitely a trend in the industry towards quality in this respect.

The future of the daycare industry looks bright and savvy entrepreneurs who are able to balance a love of children with some good business sense should be well rewarded for their efforts.